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If you have an infant or toddler,
these home safety tips will keep your child safe from dangers.
 
 

Information:

The term “child proof” is not exactly an accurate term. No matter how hard a parent tries, an infant or small child may have an accident in the home. But there are things parents can to do decrease the risk of accidents and make the home is as safe as it possibly can be.

A great way to discover possible safety hazards in the home is to get down on an infant’s level and crawl around for a while! It sounds silly, but parents are often surprised when they see what kinds of things their small child could get into.

 

Kitchen

The kitchen is perhaps the most dangerous room in the home. Cleaning supplies, major appliances, and sharp utensils can cause accidents.

Safety tips:

        Put child safety locks on ALL CABINETS AND DRAWERS within a small child’s reach, even before he or she can crawl well. This includes drawers and cabinets containing plastic bags, pots and pans, knives or other utensils, and small appliances.

        Keep all vitamins and medicines out of children’s reach.

        When taking medicine or vitamins, turn away from small children so they cannot watch you doing it. Children like to imitate their parents or older siblings.

        Secure refrigerator, dishwasher, stove, and washer/dryer doors so children can’t pinch their fingers or crawl inside and get stuck.

        Keep electrical cords rolled up and out of reach of little fingers.

        Electrical outlets, even those with cords plugged into them, should be covered so children cannot stick objects into them, or unplug appliances.

        Keep the phone numbers for poison control and emergency services in the area right next to the phone.

 

There are many types of child safety locks available. Most are portable, meaning they can go anywhere the parents go with their infant. Gadgets to roll up and hide up to eight feet of appliance or phone cord are also available.

 

Living/Dining Room

Electrical cords and outlets, vertical/horizontal blind and curtain cords, heavy furniture, and sharp edges on furniture are all safety concerns in the living room or dining room of a home.

Safety tips:

        Keep electrical cords rolled up and out of reach of little fingers.

        Electrical outlets, even those with cords plugged into them, should be covered so children cannot stick objects into them or unplug appliances.

        Curtain and vertical/horizontal blind cords must be secured well out of a child’s reach. They are a strangulation hazard. Tucking them up inside the blinds is not enough--a child can shake the blind and the cord could fall down.

        Place gates at the bottom and top of all staircases. Gates should be specifically designed for stairways. Do not use pressure gates on stairways.

        Protect toddling and crawling infants from falls against sharp-cornered furniture and fireplace hearths. Any type of soft material can be installed over sharp corners, and there are several products on the market made specifically for that purpose.

        Secure heavy furniture to walls. Young children can pull themselves up and climb on furniture, and it can tip over on top of them. There are several products available.

 

Bedroom

Heavy furniture, closet doors, and cribs can pose hazards in bedrooms.

Safety tips:

        Use safety locks on closet doors or room doors.

        Secure heavy furniture to walls.

        Position cribs/beds and any other furniture away from windows. Young children can climb up, open windows, and possibly fall out. Make sure the windows have safety locks on them, or can only be opened a few inches.

        Keep electrical cords rolled up and out of reach of little fingers.

        Electrical outlets, even those with cords plugged into them, should be covered so children cannot stick objects into them or unplug appliances.

        Curtain and vertical/horizontal blind cords must be secured well out of a child’s reach. They are a strangulation hazard. Tucking them up inside the blinds is not enough--a child can shake the blind and the cord could fall down.

Preventative Measures Information:

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Giving Parents a Helping Hand.

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YAPS is appreciative of the support received from 

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Disclaimer:
The information contained on this website is designed for educational purposes only. The information is not meant to replace the recommendations or advice of your Doctor or Pediatrician. Please consult your care providers regarding you and your child’s  health care.
 
 
 
 

 

Door County Doula

 

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